Baby trich: the role of psychosocial stressors in pediatric trichotillomania

Authors

  • Mariana Falcão Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Centro Materno-Infantil do Norte, Centro Hospitalar Universitário de Santo António https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2818-182X
  • Patrícia Magalhães Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Centro Materno-Infantil do Norte, Centro Hospitalar Universitário de Santo António
  • Teresa Sá Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Centro Materno-Infantil do Norte, Centro Hospitalar Universitário de Santo António https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8737-4325
  • Mariana Liz Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Centro Materno-Infantil do Norte, Centro Hospitalar Universitário de Santo António
  • Ana Filipa Lopes Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Centro Materno-Infantil do Norte, Centro Hospitalar Universitário de Santo António
  • Marta Antunes Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Centro Materno-Infantil do Norte, Centro Hospitalar Universitário de Santo António https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2726-9408
  • Ana Filipa Silva Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Centro Materno-Infantil do Norte, Centro Hospitalar Universitário de Santo António https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2176-9129
  • Vânia Martins Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Centro Materno-Infantil do Norte, Centro Hospitalar Universitário de Santo António

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.25753/BirthGrowthMJ.v32.i1.25718

Keywords:

pediatric, psychoeducation, psychosocial stressor, psychotherapy, trichotillomania

Abstract

Pediatric trichotillomania is characterized by the persistent pulling of one’s own hair, resulting in areas of hair loss and affecting the child and family’s daily functioning. Studies investigating the etiology, evolution, and treatment of pediatric trichotillomania are scarce. Scientific data suggests that pediatric trichotillomania can persist into adulthood and indicate the role of external stressors in its etiology. This article describes five clinical cases of children aged between 21 months and four years diagnosed with pediatric trichotillomania, with several external stressors as possible etiology. Psychoeducation and caregiver-child psychotherapy or child-centered play therapy were proposed as treatments. The authors highlight the importance of external stressors in the etiology of pediatric trichotillomania and suggest the beneficial effect of psychoeducation and psychotherapy in its course. Further research is critical to improve the screening and treatment of pediatric trichotillomania.

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Published

2023-06-23

How to Cite

1.
Falcão M, Magalhães P, Sá T, Liz M, Lopes AF, Antunes M, Silva AF, Martins V. Baby trich: the role of psychosocial stressors in pediatric trichotillomania. REVNEC [Internet]. 2023Jun.23 [cited 2024Jul.15];32(1):34-7. Available from: https://revistas.rcaap.pt/nascercrescer/article/view/25718

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Case Reports

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