Classic pertussis infection in a two-year-old child with complete primary immunization

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.25753/BirthGrowthMJ.v32.i4.26495

Keywords:

Bordetella pertussis, complete primary immunization, inspiratory whoop, paroxysms of coughing, pertussis infection

Abstract

Pertussis infection, or "whooping cough," is a highly contagious but vaccine-preventable respiratory disease caused by Bordetella pertussis. It can affect people of all ages, but is usually more severe in young infants. Despite high vaccination coverage worldwide, this infection remains a problem. Pertussis infection is spread by aerosolized droplets and the clinical presentation can vary with age and immunity. The classic presentation includes cough paroxysms, inspiratory whoop, and post-tussive vomiting. Laboratory confirmation is not necessary for diagnosis and should not delay treatment.
The authors present the case of a healthy two-year-old girl with a one-month history of dry paroxysmal cough with inspiratory whoop who was admitted to the Emergency Department for loss of consciousness during a coughing episode.
This case is intended to raise awareness of severe, life-threatening pertussis infection in children with complete primary immunization who present with respiratory symptoms consistent with this infection.

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References

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Published

2024-01-23

How to Cite

1.
Gaspar M, Sutre F, Couto C, Gavino A, Vilarinho F, Lopes A. Classic pertussis infection in a two-year-old child with complete primary immunization. REVNEC [Internet]. 2024Jan.23 [cited 2024Apr.14];32(4):314-7. Available from: https://revistas.rcaap.pt/nascercrescer/article/view/26495

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Case Reports

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