HOSPITALIZATION FOR PERTUSSIS – A TEN YEARS CASUISTIC FROM A LEVEL III HOSPITAL

Authors

  • Inês Ferreira Department of Pediatrics of Centro Materno Infantil do Norte, Centro Hospitalar do Porto
  • Diana Pinto Department of Pediatrics of Centro Materno Infantil do Norte, Centro Hospitalar do Porto
  • Vasco Lavrador Department of Pediatrics of Centro Materno Infantil do Norte, Centro Hospitalar do Porto
  • Alexandre Fernandes Department of Pediatrics of Centro Materno Infantil do Norte, Centro Hospitalar do Porto
  • Maria Guilhermina Reis Department of Pediatrics of Centro Materno Infantil do Norte, Centro Hospitalar do Porto
  • Margarida Guedes Department of Pediatrics of Centro Materno Infantil do Norte, Centro Hospitalar do Porto
  • Laura Marques Department of Pediatrics of Centro Materno Infantil do Norte, Centro Hospitalar do Porto

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.25753/BirthGrowthMJ.v25.i4.10797

Keywords:

Bordetella pertussis, children, hospital, whooping cough, vaccination

Abstract

Background: Whooping cough remains a concern in pediatric age. Adolescents and adults are recognized as a source of disease transmission, particularly for infants without complete primary immunization. The objectives of this study were to characterize clinically and epidemiologicaly hospitalized pediatric cases of pertussis.

Material and methods: Retrospective, observational study of pediatric patients hospitalized at a level III Portuguese hospital with Bordetella pertussis infection confirmed by PCR DNA assay, between January 2005 and December 2014.

Results: Forty-three patients were admitted with an median duration of eight days. We observed a higher number of admissions in 2008 and 2012, with majority of cases in the summer. The median age was 2,5 months old (minimum 12 days; maximum 16 years), of which 86.0% (n=37) infants without complete primary vaccination. All patients had cough and 48.8% (n=21) had an identified epidemiological contact of pertussis. All were treated with macrolides, with a mean interval between onset of symptoms and treatment of eight days (minimum 2; maximum 60 days). Viral coinfection occurred in 21.6% (n=14). Ten patients were admitted to intensive care unit and two deceased.

Conclusions: Like other studies, there was a incidence peak in 2012. Infants were the most vulnerable age group to infection by Bordetella pertussis, with the highest number of hospitalizations. There is a need for additional prevention strategies to improve prevention in this age group.

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Published

2017-02-03

How to Cite

Ferreira, I., Pinto, D., Lavrador, V., Fernandes, A., Reis, M. G., Guedes, M., & Marques, L. (2017). HOSPITALIZATION FOR PERTUSSIS – A TEN YEARS CASUISTIC FROM A LEVEL III HOSPITAL. NASCER E CRESCER - BIRTH AND GROWTH MEDICAL JOURNAL, 25(4), 205–210. https://doi.org/10.25753/BirthGrowthMJ.v25.i4.10797

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