Does the exercise order affect body composition in ten weeks of concurrent training?

  • Bruno Nobre Pinheiro UNIFAMETRO
  • Lino Scipião Júnior UNIFAMETRO
  • Paulo André Uchoa UNIFAMETRO
  • Samuel Brito Almeida Federal University of Ceará
  • Francisco Dower Barroso São Mateus Hospital
  • Jurandir Fernandes Cavalcante UNIFAMETRO
  • Victor Machado Reis University of Trás-os-Montes & Alto Douro
  • José Vilaça-Alves University of Trás-os-Montes & Alto Douro

Abstract

This study aimed to observe if the order of the predominantly aerobic exercise, concerning the predominantly anaerobic exercises, in the concurrent training affects the body composition. Nine young males and nine young females were equitably dived into three groups that performed for ten weeks a concurrent training, differing between them in the order of the predominantly aerobic exercise in relation to the predominantly anaerobic exercises, with the objective to change the body composition: i) before; ii) after; and iii) interleaved. The measurements of the body composition were performed before (T0) and after ten weeks (T1) of concurrent training, a protocol using the dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). It was observed a significant (p<0.05) reduction in the percentage of total body fat in all groups (25.75±9.34 to 25.08±9.38, 26.08±8.17 to 25.51±7.54, 28.20±4.29 to 26.45±5.56, T0 and T1, before, after and, interleaved, respectively). The total fat-free mass it was significantly increased in the after order group (50.74±11.82 kg to 51.01±11.85 kg, T0, and T1, respectively) and the upper limbs fat-free mass also significantly increased only in the before order group (6.66±2.64kg to 7.15±2.95kg, T0, and T1, respectively). No statistical differences were observed in any study variables between groups. Based on the data of the present study, the order of the predominantly aerobic exercise concerning the predominantly anaerobic exercises in the concurrent training did not influence the alterations in the body composition.

Published
2019-09-30
Section
Original Article