HOUSING VACANCY IN ATLANTIC EUROPE: ORIGINS AND EFFECTS ON SMALL TOWNS IN GALICIA

  • Quentin Brouard-Sala Université Caen Normandie
  • Rubén Lois-Gonzales Universidad de Santiago de Compostela
  • Philippe Madeline Université Caen Normandie
  • Maxime Marie Université Caen Normandie

Resumo

Since 1950, the countryside of Western Europe has been affected by profound socio-spatial changes. Due to net migration and the nuclearisation of families, the urbanisation process has led to demographic growth in rural areas relatively close to big cities. This has led to an increase in mobility and the development of a lifestyle that centres around the suburban model, which has contributed to older buildings being disparaged. After three decades of policies to aid the construction of new buildings, numerous vacant older housings can be found in Western Europe. At a time when the suburban model is being called into question by politicians, vacant housing is at the heart of the demographic, economic and political issues of rural areas.

A housing is said to be vacant when it is unoccupied and proposed to sale, hire, waiting to be occupied or that is kept vacant by its owner. The Spanish countryside, especially Galicia, has numerous vacant houses. In the small towns of Galicia, the area studied, vacancy is generally over 20%, broadly higher than the “normal” rate (for property speculation) of between 6% and 8%. This vacancy rate includes both older, abandoned housings and new construction.

Publicado
2019-01-18
Secção
Artigos